Team

 

 

Prof. Dr. Rainer Haselmann

Director

Tel.: +49 (0)69 798-30031
Fax: +49 (0)69 798-30044

haselmann[at]lawfin.uni-frankfurt[dot]de

Website

Rainer Haselmann is professor of Finance and Accounting at Goethe University Frankfurt. His research focuses on banking, financial regulation, corporate governance and the political economy of rule-making. He endeavors to foster research in these fields by an intensive cross-disciplinary cooperation that does not only result in interdisciplinary research output but also in new methodologies. To reach this goal, he will bring together young as well as established researchers in the fellowship program of the center. 

 

 

Prof. Dr. Tobias Tröger, LL.M.

Director

Tel.: +49 (0)69 798-34391
Fax: +49 (0)69 798-34536

troeger[at]lawfin.uni-frankfurt[dot]de

Website

Since 2011 Tobias Tröger holds the SAFE Chair of Private Law, Trade and Business Law, Jurisprudence at Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main. His research interests include corporate law (particularly, comparative corporate governance and corporate finance), banking regulation and the economic analysis of law. Tobias Tröger aspires to connect the methods of quantitative analysis with an in-depth understanding of institutions and their evolution to achieve an innovative cross-pollination of law and finance.

Affiliated Researcher

 

Prof. em. Dr. Dres. h. c. Theodor Baums

Website

Theodor Baums is Prof. emeritus of Civil and Business Law at Goethe Universität Frankfurt. His reasearch interests are corporate governance and the law and economics of corporate finance, both also in a comparative and historical perspective.

 

Matthias Goldmann

Junior Professor

 

Matthias Goldmann hast been a Junior Professor of International Public Law and Financial Law at Goethe University since 2016. He focuses on sovereign debt issues, monetary law, and banking regulation. He approaches these topics from a public law perspective, embedding the law in its historical, political philosophical, and political economic context. Stations in the past include New York University, the London School of Economics, the European University Institute, and Università di Torino.

 

Prof. Dr. Roman Inderst

Website

"Combining research in law and economics, with a special focus on finance, is mutually beneficial for both disciplines. It equips legal analysis with additional, theoretical and empirical toolkit, and ensures that economic analysis is conducted within an appropriate institutional framework."


 

Prof. Dr. Jan Pieter Krahnen

Website

 

"Bringing Law and Finance closer together has been, since its inception, a major element of the research planning at Goethe University’s House of Finance. The idea is to render finance research more relevant for society, which ultimately requires a deeper understanding of legal institutions and practice than it is traditionally embodied in financial economic analyses and policy design. The „Kolleg Forschergruppe“ LawFin has the potential not only to fulfill these interdisciplinary ambitions, but also to leave a trait on the standard curriculum in both fields, finance and legal studies."


 

Prof. Dr. Katja Langenbucher

Website

„Most legal rules are about changing behavior. Hence, making them and applying them requires an underlying theory about decision making.  Disciplines such as economics, behavioral finance, or neuroeconomics provide such theories. Setting the stage for a multi-disciplinary debate at the LawFin Center will be fascinating!" 

 

Thomas Mosk

Assistant Professor

Website

 

 



“Economists study the impact of financial regulation on financial institutions, markets and the real economy, but are usually silent about the political forces that shape regulation. The LawFin Center helps to break this silence. Bringing top legal scholars and economists together facilitates cross-pollination of ideas and shapes a new interdisciplinary research agenda.”

 

Vincenzo Pezone

Assistant Professor

Website

"When analysing policies affecting the financial sector and the real economy, economists face the risk of giving too much weight to unimportant regulations and, conversely, missing institutional details that turn out to be crucial. Joining forces with legal scholars will be crucial to achieve a better understanding of the economic effects of legal institutions."

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